All posts tagged: Writing Tips

How (Or Another Way) To Write/Develop a Unique Story

I don’t know about you, but I’ve discovered that when a story idea pops into my head, the first thing afterwards to take form is the protagonist. Sometimes even, the idea begins with a protagonist. And if you’re like most writers, the initial thought of your protagonist portrays him/her as superman, or least has the heart of superman. By now, of course, you know that in good fiction, that’s completely unacceptable (after all, even superman has a weakness called kryptonite). On that note, I’ll go ahead and say that this is the reason a lot of protagonists/stories are typical, because they follow a typical pattern. You, the writer, may think your story is cute, and your protagonist, absolutely adorable, and so you wonder why the rest of the world can’t see that. “Is there a conspiracy against me,” you might ask. In case you’re actually wondering, no, there isn’t. But there’s a reason for the reviews that accuse your story/protagonist of being flat. Your stories are … Typical. How then do you create one that’s …

Writers: When To Use Clichés, When Not To Use

By now you may have heard that clichés are boring or overrated. And that they reek of unoriginality. That’s not to say that they can’t be used. In fact, if your character will appear like they actually live on planet earth, clichés will have to come into play. How then as a writer are you supposed to use it without it seeming unoriginal? Simple. Dialogue. Let’s face it. Real people use clichés in their conversations all the time (or nearly). Check yourself. You’ll find that your favorite clichés are not far from your day to day talk. And if your character will appear real at all, they’ll have to have theirs too. Take a look at the dialogue below. “How are you this morning?” “I’m fine. I slept like a baby.” The italicized words are a cliché made of simile. But that’s okay because it’s dialogue. Like I said, real people use them. Don’t in the name of trying to avoid clichés and being original, write something like this: “Hey, what do you think about …

Those Little Rewrites

It is often said, don’t edit while you write. It slows your writing progress and sometimes messes up your writing process. But what about those little rewrites? They are editing, but in a different sort of way. Here’s what I’ve learned about my writing process. Like everyone else, I have good writing days, and bad writing days. But I discovered something. When I’ve written badly, I know it because it’s clear that I could have done better. So after a bad write, I lay off for a while until I’m feeling better. Then I go back to my paper or computer, and rewrite what I’ve written before without as much as a peek at the previous. By then whatever scene or part of a plot I’m working on would have formed properly in my head. Usually, it turns out better. A lot better than I hoped. Then I go back to my previous writing and compare the two, pick out some lines that I still deem useful and discard the rest. I do this rather …