All posts tagged: Writing

How (Or Another Way) To Write/Develop a Unique Story

I don’t know about you, but I’ve discovered that when a story idea pops into my head, the first thing afterwards to take form is the protagonist. Sometimes even, the idea begins with a protagonist. And if you’re like most writers, the initial thought of your protagonist portrays him/her as superman, or least has the heart of superman. By now, of course, you know that in good fiction, that’s completely unacceptable (after all, even superman has a weakness called kryptonite). On that note, I’ll go ahead and say that this is the reason a lot of protagonists/stories are typical, because they follow a typical pattern. You, the writer, may think your story is cute, and your protagonist, absolutely adorable, and so you wonder why the rest of the world can’t see that. “Is there a conspiracy against me,” you might ask. In case you’re actually wondering, no, there isn’t. But there’s a reason for the reviews that accuse your story/protagonist of being flat. Your stories are … Typical. How then do you create one that’s …

Keeping The Creative Juices Flowing, #3

“This topic is a series. From time to time, I will be dishing out practical advice based on my writing experiences that have worked for me.” *Watch a movie/video One of the best description scenes I’ve enjoyed pulling off came from watching a 3-second part of a scene in a movie. In my mind I had an idea of what this scene should look like in my book but time and again it remained too foggy to describe on paper or screen what I saw in my mind. The general idea just kept floating in my mind but never letting me grasp it, it was so frustrating. I’m sure you writers know what I’m talking about. I experienced this untamable fog while trying to describe a large property in my book. I went ahead and finished the manuscript hoping that by then I would have developed the description well enough to do a satisfactory job but this fog just plain refused to give way. Well, I had to get on somehow if I would declare …

Writers: When To Use Clichés, When Not To Use

By now you may have heard that clichés are boring or overrated. And that they reek of unoriginality. That’s not to say that they can’t be used. In fact, if your character will appear like they actually live on planet earth, clichés will have to come into play. How then as a writer are you supposed to use it without it seeming unoriginal? Simple. Dialogue. Let’s face it. Real people use clichés in their conversations all the time (or nearly). Check yourself. You’ll find that your favorite clichés are not far from your day to day talk. And if your character will appear real at all, they’ll have to have theirs too. Take a look at the dialogue below. “How are you this morning?” “I’m fine. I slept like a baby.” The italicized words are a cliché made of simile. But that’s okay because it’s dialogue. Like I said, real people use them. Don’t in the name of trying to avoid clichés and being original, write something like this: “Hey, what do you think about …

Your Writer Instinct Is Trustworthy

There is the tendency to always want to write like your favorite author when you first begin to write. After all, you want to be like them someday. It takes a while to realize that though you enjoy writing in a similar genre as your favorite author, you’re not exactly the same in style. That’s because every writer has a different voice and you’re already growing in yours. This could be a scary process. You can’t help but wonder if your style will be accepted by agents, publishers or the mass. It troubles you that you might not be as good as your heroes. And you can’t stand the idea of not being a successful writer someday. Yet, it scares you to let your writing out to the world. So what do you do? Answer? Trust your writer instinct. If you must move forward. It’s that simple (not easy). Pick up your pen (or place your hands on the computer) and unburden your heart of what it nudges you to write. Don’t be afraid. Trust …

Those Little Rewrites

It is often said, don’t edit while you write. It slows your writing progress and sometimes messes up your writing process. But what about those little rewrites? They are editing, but in a different sort of way. Here’s what I’ve learned about my writing process. Like everyone else, I have good writing days, and bad writing days. But I discovered something. When I’ve written badly, I know it because it’s clear that I could have done better. So after a bad write, I lay off for a while until I’m feeling better. Then I go back to my paper or computer, and rewrite what I’ve written before without as much as a peek at the previous. By then whatever scene or part of a plot I’m working on would have formed properly in my head. Usually, it turns out better. A lot better than I hoped. Then I go back to my previous writing and compare the two, pick out some lines that I still deem useful and discard the rest. I do this rather …

The Strategic Importance of Keeping your Dream Alive

Everyone has a dream. Even that person you think has no idea what to do with their life. What sets us apart is that, some of us go for it, others don’t. If you’re already on your way, you will find that you encounter detours that sometimes manage to sidetrack you. Detours are those goals you have set to help achieve an ultimate goal. If you’re able to achieve these goals, they come together, and you can realize your ultimate dream. If care is not taken, you might get comfortable along the way and be persuaded that there is no need to go any further to achieve your ultimate goal. This has been the end story of many people. They once had a dream, but got comfortable along the way and stopped dreaming. Danny Iny posted an article about this. You can read it here. Now the ringing question is, why is it so important to keep a dream alive? After all, there is nothing wrong with being comfortable and safe, right? Here’s why: For …

My Brand, My Way: Why Exactly Is Branding So Important?

Many writers get terrified at the thought of establishing a brand. And the pressure isn’t getting any less. Others just plain don’t like it. They simply want to … write. But a brand is actually not as bad as it seems. In fact, with the right frame of mind, it’s a good thing that a writer could turn into an asset, trade or indie. What exactly is the right frame of mind, you may ask. It is the perspective from which you look at it. This is how I look at it: A brand is ANYTHING that represents you. It speaks for you when you not there to do so yourself. Simply put, your brand is you. Who are you? You are a writer. And you have a reason for writing and a passion behind it. And it comes with a style and flavor. Your brand is what tells everyone that your writing is a personality of its own. And the more you appreciate this, the more you worry less that your writing isn’t turning …